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dc.contributor.authorDunhill, Alexander M.eng
dc.contributor.authorHannisdal, Bjarteeng
dc.contributor.authorBenton, Michael J.eng
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-28T13:38:53Z
dc.date.available2015-10-28T13:38:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-04
dc.identifier.citationNature Communications 2014, 5eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/10609
dc.description.abstractThe fossil record documents the history of life, but the reliability of that record has often been questioned. Spatiotemporal variability in sedimentary rock volume, sampling and research effort especially frustrates global-scale diversity reconstructions. Various proposals have been made to rectify palaeodiversity estimates using proxy measures for the availability and sampling of the rock record, but the validity of these approaches remains controversial. Targeting the rich fossil record of Great Britain as a highly detailed regional exemplar, our statistical analysis shows that marine outcrop area contains a signal useful for predicting changes in diversity, collections and formations, whereas terrestrial outcrop area contains a signal useful for predicting formations. In contrast, collection and formation counts are information redundant with fossil richness, characterized by symmetric, bidirectional information flow. If this is true, the widespread use of collection and formation counts as sampling proxies to correct the raw palaeodiversity data may be unwarranted.eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupeng
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.eng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/eng
dc.subjectBiological scienceseng
dc.subjectPalaeontologyeng
dc.titleDisentangling rock record bias and common-cause from redundancy in the British fossil recordeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2015-03-26T13:21:35Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.eng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bibo.eissn2041-1723eng
bora.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.identifier.cristinID1204331eng
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms5818
noa.nsiVDP::Matematikk og Naturvitenskap: 400::Zoologiske og botaniske fag: 480eng


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.