Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPosserud, Maj-Britt Rocio
dc.contributor.authorLundervold, Astri
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-03T07:31:32Z
dc.date.available2016-08-03T07:31:32Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationScientific World Journal 2013, 247283eng
dc.identifier.issn1537-744X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/12405
dc.description.abstractWe examined the relationship between service use and the number of problem areas as reported by parents and teachers on questionnaires among children aged 7–9 years old in the Bergen Child Study, a total population study including more than 9000 children. A problem area was counted as present if the child scored above the 95th percentile on parent and/or teacher questionnaire. A total number of 13 problem areas were included. Odd ratios (ORs) for contact with child and adolescent mental health services (CAMH), school psychology services (SPS), health visiting nurse/physician, and school support were calculated with gender as covariate. The number of symptom areas was highly predictive of service use, showing a dose-response relationship for all services. Children scoring on ≥4 problem areas had a more than hundredfold risk of being in contact with CAMH services compared to children without problems. The mean number of problem areas for children in CAMH and SPS was 6.1 and 4.4 respectively, strongly supporting the ESSENCE model predicting multisymptomatology in children in specialized services. Even after controlling for number of problem areas, boys were twice as likely as girls to be in contact with CAMH, replicating previous findings of female gender being a strong barrier to mental health services.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherHindawieng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/eng
dc.titleMental health services use predicted by number of mental health problems and gender in a total population studyeng
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Samfunnsvitenskap: 200::Psykologi: 260::Biologisk psykologi: 261
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Social sciences: 200::Psychology: 260::Biological psychology: 261
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Medisinske fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Psykiatri, barnepsykiatri: 757
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Midical sciences: 700::Clinical medical sciences: 750::Psychiatry, child psychiatry: 757
dc.date.updated2016-04-08T07:47:17Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2013 Maj-Britt Posserud and Astri J. Lundervoldeng
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1155/2013/247283
dc.identifier.cristin1030810


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution CC BY
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY