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dc.contributor.authorHornig, Mady
dc.contributor.authorBresnahan, M
dc.contributor.authorChe, X
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, A F
dc.contributor.authorUkaigwe, J E
dc.contributor.authorEddy, M L
dc.contributor.authorHirtz, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorGunnes, Nina
dc.contributor.authorLie, Kari Kveim
dc.contributor.authorMagnus, Per
dc.contributor.authorMjaaland, Siri
dc.contributor.authorReichborn-Kjennerud, Ted
dc.contributor.authorSchjølberg, Synnve
dc.contributor.authorØyen, Anne-Siri
dc.contributor.authorLevin, B
dc.contributor.authorSusser, Ezra
dc.contributor.authorStoltenberg, Camilla
dc.contributor.authorLipkin, W I
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T11:54:22Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T11:54:22Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/16262
dc.description.abstractSome studies suggest that prenatal infection increases risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study was undertaken in a prospective cohort in Norway to examine whether we could find evidence to support an association of the prenatal occurrence of fever, a common manifestation of infection, with ASD risk. Prospective questionnaires provided maternal exposure data; case status was established from clinical assessments and registry linkages. In a large, prospectively ascertained cohort of pregnant mothers and their offspring, we examined infants born greater than or equal to 32 weeks for associations between fever exposure in each trimester and ASD risk using logistic regression. Maternal exposure to second-trimester fever was associated with increased ASD risk, adjusting for presence of fever in other trimesters and confounders (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.79), with a similar, but nonsignificant, point estimate in the first trimester. Risk increased markedly with exposure to three or more fever episodes after 12 weeks' gestation (aOR, 3.12; 1.28–7.63). ASD risk appears to increase with maternal fever, particularly in the second trimester. Risk magnified dose dependently with exposure to multiple fevers after 12 weeks' gestation. Our findings support a role for gestational maternal infection and innate immune responses to infection in the pathogenesis of at least some cases of ASD.eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupeng
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nature.com/mp/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/mp2017119a.pdf
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY-NC-SAeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/eng
dc.titlePrenatal fever and autism riskeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2017-06-28T08:46:39Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright the author(s) 2017eng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleMolecular Psychiatryeng
dc.type.documentJournal article
dc.identifier.cristinID1479435
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/mp.2017.119eng
dc.source.issn1359-4184eng
dc.relation.journalMolecular Psychiatry


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