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dc.contributor.authorBoeckxstaens, Guy E.
dc.contributor.authorDrug, Vasile
dc.contributor.authorDumitraşcu, Dan Lucian
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Adam Donald
dc.contributor.authorHammer, Johann
dc.contributor.authorHausken, Trygve
dc.contributor.authorNiesler, Beate
dc.contributor.authorPohl, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorPojskic, Lejla
dc.contributor.authorPolster, Annikka V
dc.contributor.authorSimrén, Magnus
dc.contributor.authorGoebel-Stengel, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorVan Oudenhove, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorVassallo, Mario
dc.contributor.authorWensaas, Knut-Arne
dc.contributor.authorAziz, Qasim
dc.contributor.authorHoughton, Lesley Anne
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-09T12:48:19Z
dc.date.available2017-10-09T12:48:19Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/16745
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex condition with multiple factors contributing to its aetiology and pathophysiology. Aetiologically these include genetics, life-time events and environment, and physiologically, changes in motility, central processing, visceral sensitivity, immunity, epithelial permeability and gastrointestinal microflora. Such complexity means there is currently no specific reliable biomarker for IBS, and thus IBS continues to be diagnosed and classified according to symptom based criteria, the Rome Criteria. Carefully phenotyping and characterisation of a ‘large’ pool of IBS patients across Europe and even the world however, might help identify sub-populations with accuracy and consistency. This will not only aid future research but improve tailoring of treatment and health care of IBS patients.</p> <p>Purpose: The aim of this position paper is to discuss the requirements necessary to standardize the process of selecting and phenotyping IBS patients and how to organise the collection and storage of patient information/samples in such a large multi-centre pan European/global study. We include information on general demographics, gastrointestinal symptom assessment, psychological factors, quality of life, physiological evaluation, genetic/epigenetic and microbiota analysis, biopsy/blood sampling, together with discussion on the organisational, ethical and language issues associated with implementing such a study. The proposed approach and documents selected to be used in such a study was the result of a thoughtful and thorough four-year dialogue amongst experts associated with the European COST action BM1106 GENIEUR (www.GENIEUR.eu).</p>eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherWileyeng
dc.subjectfunctional gastrointestinal disorderseng
dc.subjectirritable bowel syndromeeng
dc.subjectphenotypingeng
dc.titlePhenotyping of subjects for large scale studies on patients with IBSeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.eng
dc.type.versionacceptedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleNeurogastroenterology and Motilityeng
bibo.volume28eng
bibo.issue8eng
bibo.pageStart1134eng
bibo.pageEnd1147eng
dc.identifier.cristinID1377942
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/nmo.12886eng
dc.source.issn1350-1925eng


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