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dc.contributor.authorPetursson, Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorFenstad, Anne Marie
dc.contributor.authorGøthesen, Øystein
dc.contributor.authorHaugan, Kristin
dc.contributor.authorDyrhovden, Gro Sævik
dc.contributor.authorHalland, Geir
dc.contributor.authorRöhrl, Stephan Maximillian
dc.contributor.authorAamodt, Arild
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Kjell G.
dc.contributor.authorFurnes, Ove
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-13T12:34:23Z
dc.date.available2018-06-13T12:34:23Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationPetursson G, Fenstad F, Gøthesen Ø, Haugan K, Dyrhovden GS, Halland G, Röhrl SM, Aamodt A, Nilsson KG, Furnes O. Similar migration in computer-assisted and conventional total knee arthroplasty. Acta Orthopaedica. 2017;88(2):166-172eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/17796
dc.description.abstract<p>Background and purpose &mdash; Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been used in recent years in the hope of improving the alignment and positioning of the implant, thereby achieving a better functional outcome and durability. However, the role of computer navigation in TKA is still under debate. We used radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether there are any differences in migration of the tibial component between CAS- and conventionally (CONV-) operated TKA.</p> <p>Patients and methods &mdash; 54 patients (CAS, n = 26; CONV, n = 28) with a mean age of 67 (56&ndash;78) years and with osteoarthritis or arthritic disease of the knee were recruited from 4 hospitals during the period 2009&ndash;2011. To estimate the mechanical stability of the tibial component, the patients were examined with RSA up to 24 months after operation. The following parameters representing tibial component micromotion were measured: 3-D vector of the prosthetic marker that moved the most, representing the magnitude of migration (maximum total point motion, MTPM); the largest negative value for y-translation (subsidence); the largest positive y-translation (lift-off); and prosthetic rotations. The precision of the RSA measurements was evaluated and migration in the 2 groups was compared.</p> <p>Results &mdash; Both groups had most migration within the first 3 months, but there was no statistically significant difference in the magnitude of the migration between the CAS group and the CONV group. From 3 to 24 months, the MTPM (in mm) was 0.058 and 0.103 (p = 0.1) for the CAS and CON groups, respectively, and the subsidence (in mm) was 0.005 and 0.011 (p = 0.3).</p> <p>Interpretation &mdash; Mean MTPM, subsidence, lift-off, and rotational movement of tibial trays were similar in CAS- and CONV-operated knees.</p>eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Franciseng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY-NCeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/eng
dc.titleSimilar migration in computer-assisted and conventional total knee arthroplastyeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2018-01-18T12:08:36Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2016 The Author(s)eng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
dc.type.documentJournal article
dc.identifier.cristinID1543673
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17453674.2016.1267835eng
dc.source.issn1745-3674eng
dc.source.issn1745-3682eng
dc.relation.journalActa Orthopaedica


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