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dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Isabel Sandvik
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-06T01:13:13Z
dc.date.available2019-06-06T01:13:13Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-06
dc.date.submitted2019-06-05T22:00:05Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/19889
dc.description.abstract
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the thesis is to investigate the political marriage policy in Norway after 1250. In parallel with what in Norwegian history writing is seen as a new orientation in Norwegian foreign policy after the civil war era. The study is made on the basis of the marriage policy during the civil war period in the 12th and early 13th centuries, when for a period the queens were recruited from the Norwegian aristocratic families. It examines how the king used marriage actively as a means of forming friendships and gaining supporters within Norway. The thesis also examines Håkon Håkonsson's change to the law of succession, changes in the Norwegian court and the impact of these on the marriage policy. Furthermore, the study examines the transition of the political system in Norway during this period. The study examines the political background for the choice of the Norwegian queens in the period 1281 to 1363. The study has looked at what the queens dowry were, the foreign political consequences for the marriages, and how their lives and work as queens of Norway unfolded. The study also examines whether the queens lived up to the new ideal for a reigning queen reigning of the Middle Ages, and tries to determine whether the queens successfully met this ideal. The study has examined both the Queen's seal, and the use of literature as active instruments of their new roles. The study concludes that the change in marriage policy at first occurred because of the peace settlement within Norway, and the introduction of the line of succession. The kings therefore had the opportunity to concentrate on alliances and diplomacy with other kingdoms. The second change in the marriage policy came as a natural consequence of the Norwegian east-facing policy, as well as the political climate in the realms west of Norway. Marriage policy was therefore a parameter for the foreign policy challenges that medieval Norway faced. The role of the Queen in the Middle Ages changed in pace with kingdom changes. The study has shown that the queens were active participants in the kingdom, and were able to achieve both power and status by virtue of idealistic behaviour, active alliance and diplomacy.
dc.language.isonob
dc.publisherThe University of Bergen
dc.subjectpolitikk
dc.subjectekteskap
dc.subjectDronning
dc.subjectkonge
dc.titleFra riksintern til riksekstern ekteskapspolitikk
dc.title.alternativeFrom internal to external marriage policy
dc.typeMaster thesis
dc.type.degreeHistorie mastergradsoppgave
dc.type.courseHIS350
dc.subject.archivecodeMastergrad
dc.subject.nus713107
dc.type.programMAHF-HIS
dc.date.updated2019-06-05T22:00:05Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright the Author. All rights reserved
bora.peerreviewedNot peer reviewed
fs.gradepass
fs.unitcode11-22-0


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