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dc.contributor.authorBrakstad, Ailin
dc.contributor.authorVåge, Kjetil
dc.contributor.authorHåvik, Lisbeth
dc.contributor.authorMoore, G.W.K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-25T13:25:02Z
dc.date.available2020-03-25T13:25:02Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.citationBrakstad AB, Våge K, Håvik L, Moore G. Water mass transformation in the Greenland Sea during the period 1986-2016. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 2019;49(1):121-140eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/21589
dc.description.abstractHydrographic measurements from ships, autonomous profiling floats, and instrumented seals over the period 1986–2016 are used to examine the temporal variability in open-ocean convection in the Greenland Sea during winter. This process replenishes the deep ocean with oxygen and is central to maintaining its thermohaline properties. The deepest and densest mixed layers in the Greenland Sea were located within its cyclonic gyre and exhibited large interannual variability. Beginning in winter 1994, a transition to deeper (>500 m) mixed layers took place. This resulted in the formation of a new, less dense class of intermediate water that has since become the main product of convection in the Greenland Sea. In the preceding winters, convection was limited to <300-m depth, despite strong atmospheric forcing. Sensitivity studies, performed with a one-dimensional mixed layer model, suggest that the deeper convection was primarily the result of reduced water-column stability. While anomalously fresh conditions that increased the stability of the upper part of the water column had previously inhibited convection, the transition to deeper mixed layers was associated with increased near-surface salinities. Our analysis further suggests that the volume of the new class of intermediate water has expanded in line with generally increased depths of convection over the past 10–15 years. The mean export of this water mass from the Greenland Sea gyre from 1994 to present was estimated to be 0.9 ± 0.7 Sv (1 Sv ≡ 10^6 m^3 s^−1), although rates in excess of 1.5 Sv occurred in summers following winters with deep convection.eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyeng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/eng
dc.subjectOceaneng
dc.subjectArcticeng
dc.subjectNorth Atlantic Oceaneng
dc.subjectConvectioneng
dc.subjectIn situ oceanic observationseng
dc.subjectInterannual variabilityeng
dc.titleWater mass transformation in the Greenland Sea during the period 1986-2016eng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Matematikk og naturvitenskap: 400::Geofag: 450::Oseanografi: 452
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Mathematics and natural scienses: 400::Geosciences: 450::Oceanography: 452
dc.date.updated2019-12-19T14:37:10Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2018 American Meteorological Societyeng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
dc.type.documentJournal article
dc.identifier.cristinID1648999
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-17-0273.1eng
dc.source.issn0022-3670eng
dc.source.issn1520-0485eng
dc.relation.projectIDNorges forskningsråd: 231647
dc.relation.projectIDBergens forskningsstiftelse: BFS2016REK01
dc.relation.journalJournal of Physical Oceanography


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Attribution CC BY
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