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dc.contributor.authorRyland, Hilde Katrineng
dc.contributor.authorHysing, Marieng
dc.contributor.authorPosserud, Maj-Britt Rocioeng
dc.contributor.authorGillberg, Christophereng
dc.contributor.authorLundervold, Astri Johanseneng
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:49:00Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:49:00Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-12eng
dc.identifier.citationChild and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health 2012, 6:34eng
dc.identifier.issn1753-2000eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/6617
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: The aims of the present study were to assess symptoms associated with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children with neurological disorders as reported by parents and teachers on the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ), as well as the level of agreement between informants for each child.</p> <p>Methods: The ASSQ was completed by parents and teachers of the 5781 children (11–13 years) who participated in the second wave of the Bergen Child Study (BCS), an on-going longitudinal population-based study. Out of these children, 496 were reported to have a chronic illness, including 99 whom had a neurological disorder. The neurological disorder group included children both with and without intellectual disabilities.</p> <p>Results: Children with neurological disorders obtained significantly higher parent and teacher reported ASSQ scores than did non-chronically ill children and those with other chronic illnesses (p<.01; ES = .50-1.01), and 14.1% were screened above the positive cutoff score for ASD according to their combined parent and teacher ASSQ scores. Parent/teacher agreement over ASSQ scores for children with neurological disorders was moderate to high for the total score and for three sub scores generated from a factor analysis, and low to moderate for single items.</p> <p>Conclusions: The ASSQ identifies a high rate of ASD symptoms in children with neurological disorders, and a large number of children screened in the positive range for ASD. Although a firm conclusion awaits further clinical studies, the present results suggest that health care professionals should be aware of potential ASD related problems in children with neurological disorders, and should consider inclusion of the ASSQ or similar screening instruments as part of their routine assessment of this group of children.</p>eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherChild and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Healtheng
dc.relation.ispartof<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/1956/9250" target="blank">Social functioning and mental health in children: the influence of chronic illness and intellectual function</a>eng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0eng
dc.subjectNeurological disorderseng
dc.subjectAutism spectrum symptomseng
dc.subjectThe Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaireeng
dc.titleAutism spectrum symptoms in children with neurological disorderseng
dc.typePeer reviewedeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2012 Ryland et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleChild and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Healtheng
bibo.volume6eng
bibo.issue34eng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1753-2000-6-34eng
dc.identifier.cristinID963049eng
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1753-2000-6-34
dcterms.isPartOfhttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/9250


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