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dc.contributor.authorSkaret, Erikeng
dc.contributor.authorEspelid, Ivareng
dc.contributor.authorSkeie, Marit Slåttelideng
dc.contributor.authorHaugejorden, Olaeng
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-07T08:39:44Z
dc.date.available2014-11-07T08:39:44Z
dc.date.issued2008-01-23eng
dc.identifier.issn1472-6831eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/8720
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Exploring the stability of self-reports over time in observational studies may give valuable information for the planning of future interventions. The aims of the present study were: 1) to explore the consistency of parental self-reports of oral health habits, beliefs and attitudes towards child oral health care over a two-year period; 2) to evaluate possible differences in item scores and consistency between parents with different immigrant status; and 3) to assess the construct validity of items measuring parental beliefs and attitudes towards child oral health care.</p><p>Methods: The sample (S1, n = 304) included parents of 3-year-old children in Oslo, Norway; 273 mothers of western origin (WN-group) and 31 of non-western origin (IM-group). They were surveyed in 2002 (child age 3 years) and in 2004 (child age 5 years). Two additional samples of parents were also included; one with 5-year old children in 2002 (S2, n = 382) and one with 3-yearold children in 2004 (S3, n = 427). The questionnaire included items measuring child oral health habits and parental beliefs and attitudes towards child oral health care.</p><p>Results: In 2002, 76.8% of the parents reported that they started to brush their child's teeth before the age of 1 year. Eighty-five percent of them reported the same in 2004; 87.0% of the WN-group and 33.3% of the IM-group (P &lt; 0.001). For 17 of 39 items measuring beliefs and attitudes the responses were more positive for the WN-compared to the IM-group. Parents of caries-free children in 2004 reported significantly more positive beliefs and attitudes towards child oral health care in 2002 compared to parents of children with caries in 2004 (P &lt; 0.05, P &lt; 0.01 and P &lt; 0.001). No differences in mean item scores were found between the three samples S1, S2 and S3.</p><p>Conclusion: The results showed a fair to good consistency of parental self-reports from 2002 to 2004. They also indicate that parents with different cultural backgrounds should be evaluated separately and in a cultural context.</p>en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherBioMed Centraleng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0eng
dc.titleParental beliefs and attitudes towards child caries prevention: Assessing consistency and validity in a longitudinal designeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2013-08-28T17:06:50Z
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2008 Skaret et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rights.holderErik Skaret et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.eng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleBMC Oral Healtheng
bibo.volume8eng
bibo.number1eng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6831-8-1eng
bora.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesseng
dc.identifier.cristinID365081eng
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6831-8-1


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