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dc.contributor.authorGrønli, Janneeng
dc.contributor.authorSoule, Jonathaneng
dc.contributor.authorBramham, Clive R.eng
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-19T14:32:24Z
dc.date.available2014-12-19T14:32:24Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-21eng
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/8999
dc.description.abstractSleep has been ascribed a critical role in cognitive functioning. Several lines of evidence implicate sleep in the consolidation of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. Stress disrupts sleep while impairing synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. Here, we discuss evidence linking sleep to mechanisms of protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity and synaptic scaling. We then consider how disruption of sleep by acute and chronic stress may impair these mechanisms and degrade sleep function.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherFrontierseng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/eng
dc.subjectLong-term potentiationeng
dc.subjectStresseng
dc.subjectSleep deprivationeng
dc.subjectmood disordereng
dc.subjectGene expressioneng
dc.subjecttranslation controleng
dc.subjectbrain-derived neurotrophic factoreng
dc.subjectArc/Arg3.1eng
dc.titleSleep and protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity: impacts of sleep loss and stresseng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 Grønli, Soulé and Bramham.
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscienceeng
bibo.volume7eng
bibo.number224eng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00224eng
bora.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesseng
dc.identifier.cristinID1126664eng
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00224
bora.bpoaIDbpoa57


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Attribution CC BY
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY