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dc.contributor.authorEckhoff, Rolf Kristian
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-13T11:52:04Z
dc.date.available2021-01-13T11:52:04Z
dc.date.created2020-02-20T13:54:50Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationProcess Safety and Environmental Protection. 2019, 129, 17-24.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0957-5820
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2722754
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until 2021-06-13
dc.description.abstractHot surfaces that can ignite explosible dust clouds can occur in various process situations in industry, e.g. inside furnaces, burners and dryers of various kinds. Hot surfaces can also be generated accidentally e.g. by frictional overheating of bearings and other mechanical parts, and electrically. To avoid accidental ignition of dust clouds by hot surfaces, it is essential to know the minimum temperature of any hot surface, at which a given explosible dust cloud that makes contact with that surface, will ignite. Currently the Godbert-Greenwald (G-G) furnace is the most commonly used apparatus for experimental laboratory-scale assessment of this minimum temperature for various dusts. The G-G furnace was developed by Godbert and Greenwald in 1935. Two pioneering “forerunners” of this apparatus were described by M. J. Taffanel and A. Durr (1911) in France, and by R.V. Wheeler (1913) in UK. However, neither the two “forerunners” nor the G-G furnace itself were originally intended for assessing maximum permissible temperatures of hot surfaces in industrial plant for preventing accidental hot-surface ignition of dust clouds there. This new use of the G-G furnace was not introduced in UK and the USA until in the 1940ies. The G-G furnace still appears to be the most widely used apparatus for assessing minimum hot-surface temperatures (MITs) for ignition of explosible dust clouds in air in industrial plant. However, not least in view of the history of the furnace, it is clear that the MITs that it produces do not apply to all possible hot-surface ignition scenarios that can be foreseen in industry. In most countries this problem is overcome by introducing a rather generous safety margin between the measured MIT for a given dust and the maximum permissible hot-surface temperature in industrial plants that produce and/or handle this dust.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.titleOrigin and development of the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for measuring minimum ignition temperatures of dust cloudsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2019 published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Institution of Chemical Engineers.en_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psep.2019.06.012
dc.identifier.cristin1796143
dc.source.journalProcess Safety and Environmental Protectionen_US
dc.source.volume129en_US
dc.source.pagenumber17-24en_US


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