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dc.contributor.authorKnappik, Franz Ulrich
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-22T10:25:39Z
dc.date.available2021-06-22T10:25:39Z
dc.date.created2021-01-28T09:40:31Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn9781138123564
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2760591
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until: 2021-08-07en_US
dc.description.abstractOn Robert Brandom’s reading, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel holds that the conceptual content of language, thought, and action is constituted by normative attitudes, through which participants of a discursive practice assign each other authority and responsibility. Pusillanimity is, on Brandom’s account, the characteristic normative meta-attitude of modernity, which replaces the naive form of magnanimity that had characterized ancient ethical life: a form of magnanimity that simply assumed objective norms as given part of reality. This chapter argues that magnanimous trust has deeply troublesome consequences. These consequences provide moral reasons that speak against any attempt to establish postmodern ethical life (PEL) in real practice. PEL in Brandom’s sense also requires trust in a more ordinary sense, namely that of an attitude of assuming that others will respect other persons’ roles as participants in PEL.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofReading Brandom: On A Spirit of Trust
dc.titleBrandom on Postmodern Ethical Life: Moral and Political Problemsen_US
dc.typeChapteren_US
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2020 Routledgeen_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.cristin1880951
dc.source.pagenumber184-197en_US
dc.identifier.citationGilles Bouché (Ed.), Reading Brandom: On A Spirit of Trust, London: Routledge. 2020, 184-197en_US


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