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dc.contributor.authorTvinnereim, Endre
dc.contributor.authorHaarstad, Håvard
dc.contributor.authorRødeseike, Annika
dc.contributor.authorBugnion, Veronique
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-28T12:05:46Z
dc.date.available2021-06-28T12:05:46Z
dc.date.created2021-01-31T17:23:22Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2213-624X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2761650
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until: 2022-04-23en_US
dc.description.abstractControversial policies introduced to improve public goods - such as the environment, mobility and public health - have shown patterns of initial opposition followed by broad acceptance once the public experiences positive effects of the policies. In transport policy, congestion charging is one area where such a pattern has been observed, particularly in some high-profile cases like Stockholm and London. However, existing research tends to focus on success cases and aggregate outcomes, and geographical variation in support and opposition is often overlooked. This is problematic because the public opinion on congestion charging appears highly differentiated between different areas of cities, possibly corresponding to perceived misdistribution of costs and benefits. We present a before-after study conducted in connection with the introduction of time-differentiated congestion charging rates in Bergen, Norway, in 2016. We find a substantial reduction of congestion and travel times after the policy’s implementation, but our survey data show no overall increase in policy support after implementation. There is, however, a tendency toward higher support for congestion charging in boroughs with greater delay reductions. We conclude that in securing and maintaining public support for transport measures, the intra-city distribution of costs and benefits is of critical importance.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.no*
dc.titleExplaining public acceptance of congestion charging: The role of geographical variation in the Bergen caseen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2020 Elsevieren_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cstp.2020.04.007
dc.identifier.cristin1883968
dc.source.journalCase Studies on Transport Policyen_US
dc.source.pagenumber992-1001en_US
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 295014en_US
dc.identifier.citationCase Studies on Transport Policy. 2020, 8(3), 992-1001en_US
dc.source.volume8en_US
dc.source.issue3en_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal