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dc.contributor.authorHenjum, Sigrun
dc.contributor.authorManger, Mari Skar
dc.contributor.authorHampel, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorBrantsæter, Anne Lise
dc.contributor.authorShahab-Ferdows, Setareh
dc.contributor.authorBastani, Nasser Ezzatkhah
dc.contributor.authorStrand, Tor A
dc.contributor.authorRefsum, Helga
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Lindsay H.
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-05T10:01:54Z
dc.date.available2021-08-05T10:01:54Z
dc.date.created2020-01-31T12:52:51Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.PublishedEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2020, 74 (5), 749-756.
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2766442
dc.description.abstractBackground: Human milk vitamin B12 (B12) concentrations depend on maternal status and intake; only few data are available in high-income countries. Objective: We assessed human milk B12 concentrations during the first 6 months postpartum in Norwegian women and its association with maternal dietary B12 intake and maternal urinary methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentration. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 175 mothers, exclusively (80%) or partially (20%) breastfeeding, were included. Milk B12 was measured by IMMULITE®/IMMULITE® 1000 B12 competitive protein binding assay and urinary MMA relative to creatinine (MMA/Cr) by liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. Maternal habitual B12 intake and supplement use were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Results: Mean human milk B12 concentration was 327 pmol/L (range 140-1089), with 402 pmol/L at 1 month (n = 21), 333 pmol/L at four months (n = 32), and 299 pmol/L at 6 months (n = 21). Maternal B12 intake was 5 µg/d, 89% met the Estimated Average Requirement, and supplement use did not affect milk B12 concentrations. MMA/Cr was low in all women compared with published data. In exclusively breastfeeding women, MMA/Cr (beta (95% CI) -42.5 (-82.5, -2.5) and time since birth (-4.9 (-9.6, -0.3)) were significant predictors of human milk B12 concentrations. There was no association between total B12 intake and milk B12 concentration or between total B12 intake and MMA/Cr. Conclusions: Maternal B12 status and human milk B12 concentrations are likely sufficient, based on adequate maternal B12 dietary intake combined with low urinary MMA concentrations. Nevertheless, milk B12 concentration fell during 6 months postpartum while maternal B12 status did not change.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41430-020-0567-x.pdf
dc.titleVitamin B12 concentrations in milk from Norwegian women during the six first months of lactationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2020 The Authorsen_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41430-020-0567-x
dc.identifier.cristin1788099
dc.source.journalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_US
dc.source.4074
dc.source.145
dc.source.pagenumber749-756en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2020, 74, 749–756en_US
dc.source.volume74en_US


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