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dc.contributor.authorLiu, Lian
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xiaoting
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lei
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yaoqi
dc.contributor.authorShrestha, Nawal
dc.contributor.authorNeves, Danilo M
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qinggang
dc.contributor.authorChang, Hong
dc.contributor.authorSu, Xiangyan
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yunpeng
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jianyong
dc.contributor.authorDimitrov, Dimitar
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zhiheng
dc.contributor.authorJianquan, Liu
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T09:41:10Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T09:41:10Z
dc.date.created2021-10-14T18:40:47Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.issn1752-9921
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2992202
dc.descriptionPostponed access: the file will be available after 2022-08-03en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of contemporary climate, habitat heterogeneity and long-term climate change on species richness are well studied for woody plants in forest ecosystems, but poorly understood for herbaceous plants, especially in alpine–arctic ecosystems. Here, we aim to test if the previously proposed hypothesis based on the richness–environment relationship could explain the variation in richness patterns of the typical alpine–arctic herbaceous genus Saxifraga. Using a newly compiled distribution database of 437 Saxifraga species, we estimated the species richness patterns for all species, narrow- and wide-ranged species. We used generalized linear models and simultaneous autoregressive models to evaluate the effects of contemporary climate, habitat heterogeneity and historical climate on species richness patterns. Partial regressions were used to determine the independent and shared effects of different variables. Four widely used models were tested to identify their predictive power in explaining patterns of species richness. We found that temperature was negatively correlated with the richness patterns of all and wide-ranged species, and that was the most important environmental factor, indicating a strong conservatism of its ancestral temperate niche. Habitat heterogeneity and long-term climate change were the best predictors of the spatial variation of narrow-ranged species richness. Overall, the combined model containing five predictors can explain ca. 40%–50% of the variation in species richness. We further argued that additional evolutionary and biogeographical processes might have also played an essential role in shaping the Saxifraga diversity patterns and should be considered in future studies.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.titleGlobal patterns of species richness of the holarctic alpine herb Saxifraga: The role of temperature and habitat heterogeneityen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2021 the authorsen_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jpe/rtab085
dc.identifier.cristin1946081
dc.source.journalJournal of Plant Ecologyen_US
dc.source.pagenumber237–252en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Plant Ecology. 2022, 15 (2), 237–252.en_US
dc.source.volume15en_US
dc.source.issue2en_US


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