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dc.contributor.authorVederhus, Johannes
dc.contributor.authorHusebye, Elisabeth Synnøve Nilsen
dc.contributor.authorEid, Karine
dc.contributor.authorGilhus, Nils Erik
dc.contributor.authorBjørk, Marte-Helene
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-24T09:12:58Z
dc.date.available2022-06-24T09:12:58Z
dc.date.created2022-04-23T12:48:51Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.issn0013-9580
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/3000539
dc.description.abstractObjective This study was undertaken to examine the prevalence of self-reported experiences with abuse in pregnant women with epilepsy and the association between having experienced abuse and childbirth expectations, particularly the fear of childbirth. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of women with and without epilepsy enrolled in the Norwegian Mother, Father, and Child Cohort Study 1999–2008. Data on epilepsy diagnosis; antiseizure medication (ASM) use; emotional, physical, and sexual abuse; and childbirth expectations were collected from questionnaires completed during gestational Weeks 17–19 and 30. Results Our study population included 295 women with ASM-treated epilepsy, 318 women with ASM-untreated epilepsy, and 93 949 women without epilepsy. A total of 115 women (47%) with ASM-treated and 132 women (57%) with ASM-untreated epilepsy reported any emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, compared to 25 100 women (32%) without epilepsy. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for having experienced any abuse were 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–2.3) and 1.8 (95% CI = 1.4–2.2) for ASM-treated and ASM-untreated epilepsy, respectively. A total of 29 women (11%) with ASM-treated and 34 women (11%) with ASM-untreated epilepsy reported having been raped, compared to 3088 women (4%) without epilepsy (aORs = 2.8 [95% CI = 1.8–4.1] and 2.9 [95% CI = 2.0–4.2], respectively). In nulliparous women with ASM-untreated epilepsy, having experienced abuse was associated with fear of childbirth; 22 women (31%) with abuse experiences reported fear of childbirth compared to five women (7%) with no experience of abuse (aOR = 5.4 [95% CI = 1.7–17.2]). This association was not seen in multiparous women or in women with ASM-treated epilepsy. Significance More women with epilepsy reported emotional, physical, and sexual abuse than women without epilepsy. Such experiences may be associated with childbirth expectations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsNavngivelse-Ikkekommersiell 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/deed.no*
dc.titlePrevalence of self-reported emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and association with fear of childbirth in pregnant women with epilepsy: The Norwegian Mother, Father, and Child Cohort Studyen_US
dc.title.alternativePrevalence of self-reported emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and association with fear of childbirth in pregnant women with epilepsy: The Norwegian Mother, Father, and Child Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2022 The Authorsen_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/epi.17242
dc.identifier.cristin2018593
dc.source.journalEpilepsiaen_US
dc.identifier.citationEpilepsia, 2022.en_US


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Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell 4.0 Internasjonal