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dc.contributor.authorFernández-Palacios, Enrique
dc.contributor.authorJambrina-Enríquez, Margarita
dc.contributor.authorMentzer, Susan M.
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez de Vera, Caterina
dc.contributor.authorDinckal, Ada
dc.contributor.authorÉgüez, Natalia
dc.contributor.authorHerrera-Herrera, Antonio V.
dc.contributor.authorNavarro Mederos, Juan Francisco
dc.contributor.authorMarrero Salas, Efraín
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorMallol, Carolina
dc.date.accessioned2023-10-20T11:32:51Z
dc.date.available2023-10-20T11:32:51Z
dc.date.created2023-09-25T18:15:49Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.issn0883-6353
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/3097786
dc.description.abstractThe indigenous populations of La Palma (Canary Islands), who arrived on the island from Northwest Africa ca. 2000 years B.P., were predominantly pastoralists. Yet, many aspects of their subsistence economy such as the procurement, management, and use of wild plant resources remain largely unknown. To explore this, we studied the 600–1100-year-old archaeological site of Belmaco Cave, which comprises a stratified sedimentary deposit representative of a fumier. Here, we present a high-resolution, multiproxy geoarchaeological study combining soil micromorphology, lipid biomarker analysis, X-ray diffraction, μ-X-ray diffraction, μ-X-ray fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and μ-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, to characterize formation processes and explore plant sources. Recurrent goat/sheep habitation and maintenance activities are represented by interstratified layers of unburned dung, charcoal-rich sediment, and dung ash. Lipid biomarker data show a herd diet mainly composed of herbaceous plants, which is key to understanding the mobility of indigenous shepherds. Our results also revealed an unusual suite of authigenic minerals including hazenite, aragonite, and sylvite, possibly formed through diagenetic processes involving interaction between ash, dung, urine, volcanogenic components, and bacterial activity, coupled with arid and alkaline conditions. Our study shows the potential of a multiproxy approach to a fumier deposit in a volcanogenic sedimentary context.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.no*
dc.titleReconstructing formation processes at the Canary Islands indigenous site of Belmaco Cave (La Palma, Spain) through a multiproxy geoarchaeological approachen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2023 The Author(s)en_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gea.21972
dc.identifier.cristin2178735
dc.source.journalGeoarchaeologyen_US
dc.source.pagenumber713-739en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeoarchaeology. 2023, 38 (6), 713-739.en_US
dc.source.volume38en_US
dc.source.issue6en_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal