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dc.contributor.authorTorsvik, Anjaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStieber, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorEnger, Per Øyvinden_US
dc.contributor.authorGolebiewska, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMolven, Andersen_US
dc.contributor.authorSvendsen, Agneteen_US
dc.contributor.authorWestermark, Bengten_US
dc.contributor.authorNiclou, Simone P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Thale Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorChekenya, PhD, Dr Philos, Dr. Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBjerkvig, Rolfen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T08:14:50Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T08:14:50Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.issn2045-7634
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/10195
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that in vitro subculture represents a selection pressure on cell lines, and over time this may result in a genetic drift in the cancer cells. In addition, long-term cultures harbor the risk of cross-contamination with other cell lines. The consequences may have major impact on experimental results obtained in various laboratories, where the cell lines no longer reflect the original tumors that they are supposed to represent. Much neglected in the scientific community is a close monitoring of cell cultures by regular phenotypic and genetic characterization. In this report, we present a thorough characterization of the commonly used glioblastoma (GBM) model U-251, which in numerous publications has been wrongly identified as U-373, due to an earlier cross-contamination. In this work, the original U-251 and three subclones of U-251, commonly referred to as U-251 or U-373, were analyzed with regard to their DNA profile, morphology, phenotypic expression, and growth pattern. By array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we show that only the original low-passaged U-251 cells, established in the 1960s, maintain a DNA copy number resembling a typical GBM profile, whereas all long-term subclones lost the typical GBM profile. Also the long-term passaged subclones displayed variations in phenotypic marker expression and showed an increased growth rate in vitro and a more aggressive growth in vivo. Taken together, the variations in genotype and phenotype as well as differences in growth characteristics may explain different results reported in various laboratories related to the U-251 cell line.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherWileyeng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/eng
dc.subjectaCGHeng
dc.subjectcell lineseng
dc.subjectcross-contaminationeng
dc.subjectGBMeng
dc.subjectin vitro modelseng
dc.subjectSTReng
dc.subjectU251eng
dc.subjectU373eng
dc.titleU-251 revisited: genetic drift and phenotypic consequences of long-term cultures of glioblastoma cellsen_US
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2015-08-04T08:09:53Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 The Authors
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.219
dc.identifier.cristin1222106
dc.source.journalCancer Medicine
dc.source.403
dc.source.144
dc.source.pagenumber812-824


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY