Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRettberg, Jill Walker
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-03T12:07:20Z
dc.date.available2016-10-03T12:07:20Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-05
dc.identifier.issn2162-3317
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/12897
dc.descriptionPaper presented at Association of Internet Researchers: AoIR2016, Berlin 5-8 October 2016
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses three recent works of art that interrogate the relationship between human perception and machine vision: Nadav Assor’s art-documentary Lessons on Leaving Your Body (2014), Muse’s VR music video Revolt (2015), and Erica Scourti’s Body Scan (2015). The goal is to understand how these works present the relationship between human and machine vision. When machines can see us, do we see them as subjects in their own right, or as expansions of our human selves? The paper argues that the three works discussed see machine vision in three different ways: as an expansion of human perception, as a hostile, controlling force that should be destroyed, and as a commercialised force altering or co-constructing the way we view our own humanity. Theoretical perspectives include Andrejevic’s work on the sensor society and self-droning (Andrejevic and Burdon 2015; Andrejevic 2015), Flusser on the relationship between the human and the apparatus of technical images (Flusser 2000), and work on posthumanism (e.g. Hayles 1999; Nayar 2014).en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherAssociation of Internet Researchers (AoIR)eng
dc.title'Now Objects Perceive Me': Art that Interrogates Machine Visioneng
dc.typeConference object
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.description.versionacceptedVersion
dc.rights.holderCopyright the author. All rights reservedeng


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record