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dc.contributor.authorTapia, Germanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, Georginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorYe, Jodyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGillard, Benjamin Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorChipper-Keating, Sarannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMårild, Karl Staffanen_US
dc.contributor.authorViken, Marte Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLie, Benedicte Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorJoner, Geiren_US
dc.contributor.authorSkrivarhaug, Torilden_US
dc.contributor.authorNjølstad, Pål Rasmusen_US
dc.contributor.authorStørdal, Ketilen_US
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorStene, Lars Christian Mørchen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-22T11:28:14Z
dc.date.available2019-08-22T11:28:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-09
dc.PublishedTapia G, Mortimer, Ye, Gillard, Chipper-Keating, Mårild K, Viken MK, Lie BA, Joner GJ, Skrivarhaug T, Njølstad PR, Størdal K, Gillespie K, Stene LC. Maternal microchimerism in cord blood and risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. Pediatric Diabetes. 2019;20(6):728-735eng
dc.identifier.issn1399-543X
dc.identifier.issn1399-5448
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/20701
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until: 07.06.2019en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Maternal microchimerism (MMc), the transmission of small quantities of maternal cells to the fetus, is relatively common and persistent. MMc has been detected with increased frequency in the circulation and pancreas of type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We investigated for the first time whether MMc levels at birth predict future T1D risk. We also tested whether cord blood MMc predicted MMc in samples taken at T1D diagnosis. Methods: Participants in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study were human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II typed to determine non‐inherited, non‐shared maternal alleles (NIMA). Droplet digital (dd) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays specific for common HLA class II NIMA (HLADQB1*03:01, *04:02, and *06:02/03) were developed and validated. MMc was estimated as maternal DNA quantity in the fetal circulation, by NIMA specific ddPCR, measured in cord blood DNA from 71 children who later developed T1D and 126 controls within the cohort. Results: We found detectable quantities of MMc in 34/71 future T1D cases (48%) and 53/126 controls (42%) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68‐2.36), and no significant difference in ranks of MMc quantities between cases and controls (Mann‐Whitney P = .46). There was a possible association in the NIMA HLA‐DQB1*03:01subgroup with later T1D (aOR 3.89, 95%CI 1.05‐14.4). MMc in cord blood was not significantly associated with MMc at T1D diagnosis. Conclusions: Our findings did not support the hypothesis that the degree of MMc in cord blood predict T1D risk. The potential subgroup association with T1D risk should be replicated in a larger cohort.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherWileyeng
dc.subjectchildhoodeng
dc.subjectHLAeng
dc.subjectPregnancyeng
dc.subjectDiabetes type 1eng
dc.subjectmicrochimerismeng
dc.titleMaternal microchimerism in cord blood and risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetesen_US
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2019-06-19T11:36:58Z
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2019 John Wiley & Sons
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/pedi.12875
dc.identifier.cristin1706096
dc.source.journalPediatric Diabetes


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