Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWisniewska-Dale, Malgorzata Anna
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-11T11:48:25Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-08
dc.date.submitted2019-10-21T10:08:24.316Z
dc.identifiercontainer/70/da/e4/af/70dae4af-4377-4a5c-8cc0-b0b5699545fb
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/20968
dc.descriptionPostponed access: the file will be accessible after 2020-05-08
dc.description.abstractDuring the past decades, drug delivery system has become an important research topic in the pharmaceutical field. Conventionally, the therapeutic concentration of a drug in the blood is achieved by repeated administration in the form of pills or injections. Such administration results in an unstable drug concentration in the blood as it peaks shortly after the administration and rapidly declines afterwards. A drug delivery system delivers therapeutically active compounds in a controlled manner with respect to time period and release rate, and maintains drug concentration in the organism in the therapeutic window. The use of hydrogels for applications in areas such as drug delivery systems, tissue engineering scaffolds, contact lenses and wound dressings has become very popular due to their adjustable porous structure. Due to their non-invasive nature, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques have been increasingly used to study drug delivery systems by monitoring molecular mass transport. In my dissertation, I have established a reliable methodology for determining the structural properties of hydrogels. Furthermore, I have investigated the effect of structural properties on molecular mass transport in hydrogels. Finally, I have examined how NMR and MRI techniques can be used to improve existing experimental procedures to characterize drug release from hydrogels.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherThe University of Bergenen_US
dc.relation.haspartPaper I: Malgorzata Anna Wisniewska, John Georg Seland, Wei Wang, Determining the scaling of gel mesh size with changing crosslinker concentration using dynamic swelling, rheometry, and PGSE NMR spectroscopy, Journal of Applied Polymer Science 135, 45, 2018, 46695. The article is available in the main thesis. The article is also available at: <a href=" https://doi.org/10.1002/app.46695" target="blank"> https://doi.org/10.1002/app.46695</a>.en_US
dc.relation.haspartPaper II: Malgorzata Anna Wisniewska, John Georg Seland, Investigating structure-dependent diffusion in hydrogels using spatially resolved NMR spectroscopy, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 533, 2019, 671. The article is available in the main thesis. The article is also available at: <a href=" https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2018.08.112" target="blank"> https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2018.08.112</a>.en_US
dc.relation.haspartPaper III: Malgorzata Anna Wisniewska, Kristine Spildo, John Georg Seland, MRI and MRS study of poly(N-isopopylacrylamide) hydrogel volume phase transition and release of b-cyclodextrins. The article is not available in BORA.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)eng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/eng
dc.titleCharacterizing mass transport in hydrogels using Nuclear Magnetic Resonanceen_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesis
dc.date.updated2019-10-21T10:08:24.316Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright the Author.en_US
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-4642-8569
dc.identifier.cristin1743257
fs.unitcode12-31-0
dc.date.embargoenddate2020-05-08


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)