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dc.contributor.authorPichler, Aloiseng
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-05T12:51:34Z
dc.date.available2014-02-05T12:51:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-10eng
dc.PublishedPhilosophy and Literature 37(2): 435-450eng
dc.identifier.issn0190-0013
dc.identifier.otherhttp://muse.jhu.edu/journals/philosophy_and_literature/v037/37.2.pichler.htmleng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/7762
dc.description.abstractDoes the way authors treat their own works tell us something about how these works are to be understood? Not necessarily. But then a standard argument against the “New Wittgenstein” comes under question. The argument is: the undogmatic interpretation of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus cannot be correct, since Wittgenstein himself later treats it as a work that holds certain positions. My response is: the argument is only correct if the answer to four specific questions is “yes.” The main purpose of the paper is to bring issues of philosophical authorship more into focus within Wittgensteinian interpretation.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Presseng
dc.subjectWittgensteineng
dc.subjectAuthorshipeng
dc.subjectPhilosophyeng
dc.subjectArgumenteng
dc.subjectCriticismeng
dc.titleReflections on a Prominent Argument in the Wittgenstein Debateeng
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.description.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2013 The Johns Hopkins University Press
dc.identifier.cristin1066864
dc.source.journalPhilosophy and Literature
dc.source.4037
dc.source.142
dc.source.pagenumber435-450


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