Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAssey, Vincent Didaseng
dc.contributor.authorMgoba, Celestineng
dc.contributor.authorMlingi, Nicholauseng
dc.contributor.authorSanga, Alfredeng
dc.contributor.authorNdossi, Godwin D.eng
dc.contributor.authorGreiner, Tedeng
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Stefaneng
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-06T13:53:33Z
dc.date.available2010-01-06T13:53:33Z
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutrition 10(10): 1032-1038en
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/3719
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine iodine levels in salt and iodine deficiency prevalence in school-aged children in 16 districts in Tanzania with previous severe iodine deficiency. Design: A cross-sectional study in schoolchildren. Systematic probability sampling was used to select schools and subjects for goitre assessment and urinary iodine determination. Setting: Sixteen districts randomly selected from the 27 categorised as severely iodinedeficient in Tanzania. Subjects: The study population was primary-school children aged 6–18 years who were examined for goitre prevalence and urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Salt samples from schoolchildren’s homes and from shops were tested for iodine content. Results: The study revealed that 83.3% of households (n = 21 160) in the surveyed districts used iodised salt. Also, 94% of sampled shops (n = 397) sold iodised salt, with a median iodine level of 37.0 ppm (range 4.2–240 ppm). Median UIC in 2089 schoolchildren was 235.0 μg 1-¹ and 9.3% had UIC values below 50 μg 1-¹. The overall unweighted mean visible and total goitre prevalence was 6.7% and 24.3%, respectively (n = 16 222). The age group 6–12 years had the lowest goitre prevalence (3.6% visible and 18.0% total goitre, n = 7147). The total goitre prevalence had decreased significantly in all districts from an unweighted mean of 65.4% in the 1980s to 24.3% in 1999 (P < 0.05). We believe this difference was also biologically significant. Conclusion: These findings indicate that iodine deficiency is largely eliminated in the 16 districts categorised as severely iodine-deficient in Tanzania, and that the iodine content of salt purchased from shops is highly variable.en
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Presseng
dc.relation.ispartof<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/1956/3718" target="blank">Controlling iodine deficiency disorders through salt iodation in Tanzania</a>eng
dc.subjectGoitre prevention and controleng
dc.subjectUrinary iodine deficiencyeng
dc.subjectIodised oileng
dc.subjectIodised salteng
dc.subjectTanzaniaeng
dc.titleRemaining challenges in Tanzania’s efforts to eliminate iodine deficiencyeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.typePeer reviewedeng
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700nob
dc.rights.holderThe Authorseng
dc.type.versionPublished versioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980007666695eng
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980007666695
dcterms.isPartOfhttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/3718


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record