BORA - UiB

Bergen Open Research Archive

Gene expression analyses of immune responses in Atlantic salmon during early stages of infection by salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) revealed bi-phasic responses coinciding with the copepod-chalimus transition

Bergen Open Research Archive

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Tadiso, Tariku Markos
dc.contributor.author Krasnov, Aleksei
dc.contributor.author Skugor, Stanko
dc.contributor.author Afanasyev, Sergey
dc.contributor.author Hordvik, Ivar
dc.contributor.author Nilsen, Frank
dc.date.accessioned 2011-04-01T08:32:15Z
dc.date.available 2011-04-01T08:32:15Z
dc.date.issued 2011-03-07
dc.identifier.citation BMC Genomics 12:141 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-12-141
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1956/4621
dc.description.abstract The salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis Krøyer), an ectoparasitic copepod with a complex life cycle causes significant losses in salmon aquaculture. Pesticide treatments against the parasite raise environmental concerns and their efficacy is gradually decreasing. Improvement of fish resistance to lice, through biological control methods, needs better understanding of the protective mechanisms. We used a 21 k oligonucleotide microarray and RT-qPCR to examine the time-course of immune gene expression changes in salmon skin, spleen, and head kidney during the first 15 days after challenge, which encompassed the copepod and chalimus stages of lice development. Results Large scale and highly complex transcriptome responses were found already one day after infection (dpi). Many genes showed bi-phasic expression profiles with abrupt changes between 5 and 10 dpi (the copepod-chalimus transitions); the greatest fluctuations (up- and down-regulation) were seen in a large group of secretory splenic proteases with unknown roles. Rapid sensing was witnessed with induction of genes involved in innate immunity including lectins and enzymes of eicosanoid metabolism in skin and acute phase proteins in spleen. Transient (1-5 dpi) increase of T-cell receptor alpha, CD4-1, and possible regulators of lymphocyte differentiation suggested recruitment of T-cells of unidentified lineage to the skin. After 5 dpi the magnitude of transcriptomic responses decreased markedly in skin. Up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in all studied organs suggested establishment of a chronic inflammatory status. Up-regulation of putative lymphocyte G0/G1 switch proteins in spleen at 5 dpi, immunoglobulins at 15 dpi; and increase of IgM and IgT transcripts in skin indicated an onset of adaptive humoral immune responses, whereas MHCI appeared to be down-regulated. Conclusions Atlantic salmon develops rapid local and systemic reactions to L. salmonis, which, however, do not result in substantial level of protection. The dramatic changes observed after 5 dpi can be associated with metamorphosis of copepod, immune modulation by the parasite, or transition from innate to adaptive immune responses. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.relation.ispartof <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/1956/5823" target="blank">Molecular characterisation of key components of the mucosal immune system in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) and transcriptome analysis of responses against the salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)</a> en
dc.rights Copyright 2011 Tadiso et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_US
dc.title Gene expression analyses of immune responses in Atlantic salmon during early stages of infection by salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) revealed bi-phasic responses coinciding with the copepod-chalimus transition en_US
dc.type Peer reviewed en_US
dc.type Journal article en_US
dc.subject.nsi VDP::Mathematics and natural science: 400 en_US
dc.rightsHolder Tadiso et al. en_US
dc.type.version publishedVersion en_US


Files in this item

 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright 2011 Tadiso et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2011 Tadiso et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Search BORA


Browse

My Account