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Helicobacter pylori in apparently healthy children aged 0-12 years in urban Kampala, Uganda: a community-based cross sectional survey

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dc.contributor.author Hestvik, Elin eng
dc.contributor.author Tylleskär, Thorkild eng
dc.contributor.author Kaddu-Mulindwa, Deogratias H. eng
dc.contributor.author Ndeezi, Grace eng
dc.contributor.author Grahnquist, Lena eng
dc.contributor.author Olafsdottir, Edda eng
dc.contributor.author Tumwine, James K. eng
dc.date.accessioned 2011-04-19T09:06:50Z
dc.date.available 2011-04-19T09:06:50Z
dc.date.issued 2010-06-16 eng
dc.identifier.citation BMC Gastroenterology 10:62 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1471-230X eng
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1956/4677
dc.description.abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in human beings. Studies have showed a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among people in low-income countries and colonization early in life. A monoclonal antigen test, performed on faeces, HpSA®ImmunoCardSTAT, has a high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy and the faecal test can be performed in all ages, also in resource-limited settings. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with Helicobacter pylori colonization in apparently healthy children aged 0-12 years in urban Kampala, Uganda. Method We tested 427 apparently healthy children, age 0-12 years (211 males, 216 females), in a cross sectional survey for Helicobacter pylori colonization using HpSA ®ImmunoCardSTAT. A short standardized interview with socio-demographic information and medical history was used to assess risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the 427 children was 44.3% (189 out of 427). Early colonization was common, 28.7%, in children younger than 1 year of age. The age specific rates were 46.0% in children age 1- < 3 years, 51.7% in children age 3- < 6 years, 54.8% in children age 6- < 9 years and 40.0% in children age 9- < 12 years. There was a significant difference in prevalence by gender; female 38.5% versus male 49.8% and by type of housing; permanent house 38.5% versus semi-permanent house 48.6%. Congestive living and education level of the female caretaker showed a clear trend for a difference in prevalence. Factors independently associated with Helicobacter pylori colonization included: drugs taken last three months, using a pit latrine, sources of drinking water and wealth index. Conclusion The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization among urban Ugandan children is high at an early age and increases with age. The impact of Helicobacter pylori colonization on children's health in Uganda needs to be further clarified. en_US
dc.language.iso eng eng
dc.publisher BioMed Central eng
dc.relation.ispartof <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/1956/5732" target="blank">Helicobacter pylori and faecal calprotectin in apparently healthy and HIV-infected Ugandan children</a> en
dc.rights Attribution CC BY eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 eng
dc.title Helicobacter pylori in apparently healthy children aged 0-12 years in urban Kampala, Uganda: a community-based cross sectional survey eng
dc.type Peer reviewed eng
dc.type Journal article eng
dc.rights.holder Copyright 2010 Hestvik et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rights.holder Hestvik et al. eng
dc.type.version publishedVersion eng
bora.peerreviewed Peer reviewed eng
bora.cristinID 349234 eng
bibo.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-10-62 eng
dc.identifier.cristinID 349234 eng
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-10-62


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