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dc.contributor.authorKlokk, Marianneeng
dc.contributor.authorGotestam, Karl Gunnareng
dc.contributor.authorMykletun, Arnsteineng
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-26T08:26:31Z
dc.date.available2011-04-26T08:26:31Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-22eng
dc.identifier.citationBMC Dermatology 10:3en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-5945eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/4692
dc.description.abstractBackground The association between anxiety and depression, and eczema is well known in the literature, but factors underlying this association remain unclear. Low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and female gender have been found to be associated with both depression and eczema. Somatization and health anxiety are known to be associated with anxiety and depression, further, somatization symptoms and health anxiety have also been found in several dermatological conditions. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, female gender, somatization and health anxiety are possible contributing factors in the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema. The aim of the study is to examine the relevance of proposed contributing factors for the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema, including, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, female gender, health anxiety and somatization. Methods Anxiety and depression was measured in the general population (n = 15715) employing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Information on eczema, female gender, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, health anxiety and somatization was obtained by self-report. Results Somatization and health anxiety accounted for more than half of the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema, while the other factors examined were of minor relevance for the association of interest. Conclusions We found no support for female gender and omega-3 fatty acid supplement as contributing factors in the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema. Somatization and health anxiety accounted for about half of the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema, somatization contributed most. The association between anxiety/depression, and eczema was insignificant after adjustment for somatization and health anxiety. Biological mechanisms underlying the mediating effect of somatization are yet to be revealed.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherBioMed Centraleng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0eng
dc.titleFactors accounting for the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema: the Hordaland health study (HUSK)eng
dc.typePeer reviewedeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2010 Klokk et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rights.holderKlokk et al.eng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.cristinID340882eng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-5945-10-3eng
dc.identifier.cristinID340882eng
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-5945-10-3


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