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Multiple micronutrient supplementation improves vitamin B12 and folate concentrations of HIV infected children in Uganda: a randomized controlled trial

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dc.contributor.author Ndeezi, Grace eng
dc.contributor.author Tumwine, James K. eng
dc.contributor.author Ndugwa, Christopher M. eng
dc.contributor.author Bolann, Bjørn J. eng
dc.contributor.author Tylleskär, Thorkild eng
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-07T09:19:12Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-07T09:19:12Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05-21 eng
dc.identifier.citation Nutrition Journal 10(56) en
dc.identifier.issn 1475-2891 eng
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1956/5152
dc.description.abstract Background: The effect of multiple micronutrient supplementation on vitamin B12 and folate has hither to not been reported in African HIV infected children. This paper describes vitamin B12 and folate status of Ugandan HIV infected children aged 1-5 years and reports the effect of multiple micronutrient supplementation on serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations. Methods: Of 847 children who participated in a multiple micronutrient supplementation trial, 214 were assessed for vitamin B12 and folate concentrations pre and post supplementation. One hundred and four children were randomised to two times the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of a 14 multiple micronutrient supplement (MMS) and 114 to a ‘standard of care’ supplement of 6 multivitamins (MV). Serum vitamin B12 was measured by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay and folate by a competitive protein-binding assay using Modular E (Roche) automatic analyzer. Vitamin B12 concentrations were considered low if less than 221picomoles per litre (pmol/L) and folate if < 13.4 nanomoles per litre (nmol/L). The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test was used to measure the difference between pre and post supplementation concentrations. Results: Vitamin B12 was low in 60/214 (28%) and folate in 62/214 (29.0%) children. In the MMS group, the median concentration (IQR) of vitamin B12 at 6 months was 401.5 (264.3 - 518.8) pmol/L compared to the baseline of 285.5 (216.5 - 371.8) pmol/L, p < 0.001. The median (IQR) folate concentrations increased from 17.3 (13.5 - 26.6) nmol/L to 27.7 (21.1 - 33.4) nmol/L, p < 0.001. In the ‘standard of care’ MV supplemented group, the median concentration (IQR) of vitamin B12 at 6 months was 288.5 (198.8 - 391.0) pmol/L compared to the baseline of 280.0 (211.5 - 386.3) pmol/L while the median (IQR) folate concentrations at 6 months were 16.5 (11.7 - 22.1) nmol/L compared to 15.7 (11.9 - 22.1) nmol/L at baseline. There was a significant difference in the MMS group in both vitamin B12 and folate concentrations but no difference in the MV group. Conclusions: Almost a third of the HIV infected Ugandan children aged 1-5 years had low serum concentrations of vitamin B12 and folate. Multiple micronutrient supplementation compared to the ‘standard of care’ supplement of 6 multivitamins improved the vitamin B12 and folate status of HIV infected children in Uganda. en
dc.language.iso eng eng
dc.publisher BioMed Central eng
dc.relation.ispartof <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/1956/5153" target="_blank">Multiple micronutrient supplementation in HIV-infected children. A randomised trial among children aged 1-5 years in Uganda</a> eng
dc.rights Attribution CC BY eng
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 eng
dc.title Multiple micronutrient supplementation improves vitamin B12 and folate concentrations of HIV infected children in Uganda: a randomized controlled trial eng
dc.type Peer reviewed eng
dc.type Journal article eng
dc.subject.nsi VDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Clinical medical disciplines: 750::Communicable diseases: 776 eng
dc.rights.holder Copyright 2011 Ndeezi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.type.version publishedVersion eng
bora.peerreviewed Peer reviewed eng
bora.cristinID 841070 eng
bibo.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-10-56 eng
dc.identifier.cristinID 841070 eng
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-10-56
dcterms.isPartOf http://hdl.handle.net/1956/5153


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