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Patients Referred to a Norwegian Trauma Centre: effect of transfer distance on injury patterns, use of resources and outcomes

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dc.contributor.author Kristiansen, Thomas
dc.contributor.author Lossius, Hans Morten
dc.contributor.author Søreide, Kjetil
dc.contributor.author Steen, Petter A.
dc.contributor.author Gaarder, Christine
dc.contributor.author Næss, Pål A.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-06T14:26:36Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-06T14:26:36Z
dc.date.issued 2011-06-16
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes 2011, 5:9 en
dc.identifier.issn 1752-2897
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1752-2897-5-9
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1956/5560
dc.description.abstract Background: Triage and interhospital transfer are central to trauma systems. Few studies have addressed transferred trauma patients. This study investigated transfers of variable distances to OUH (Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål), one of the largest trauma centres in Europe. Methods: Patients included in the OUH trauma registry from 2001 to 2008 were included in the study. Demographic, injury, management and outcome data were abstracted. Patients were grouped according to transfer distance: ≤20 km, 21-100 km and > 100 km. Results: Of the 7.353 included patients, 5.803 were admitted directly, and 1.550 were transferred. The number of transfers per year increased, and there was no reduction in injury severity during the study period. Seventy-six per cent of the transferred patients were severely injured. With greater transfer distances, injury severity increased, and there were larger proportions of traffic injuries, polytrauma and hypotensive patients. With shorter distances, patients were older, and head injuries and injuries after falls were more common. The shorter transfers less often activated the trauma team: ≤20 km -34%; 21-100 km -51%; > 100 km -61%, compared to 92% of all directly admitted patients. The mortality for all transferred patients was 11%, but was unequally distributed according to transfer distance. Conclusion: This study shows heterogeneous characteristics and high injury severity among interhospital transfers. The rate of trauma team assessment was low and should be further examined. The mortality differences should be interpreted with caution as patients were in different phases of management. The descriptive characteristics outlined may be employed in the development of triage protocols and transfer guidelines. en
dc.language.iso eng en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.rights Copyright 2011 Kristiansen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ en
dc.subject Interhospital Transfer en
dc.subject Trauma System en
dc.title Patients Referred to a Norwegian Trauma Centre: effect of transfer distance on injury patterns, use of resources and outcomes en
dc.type Peer reviewed en
dc.type Journal article en
dc.subject.nsi VDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Health sciences: 800::Health service and health administration research: 806 en
dc.subject.nsi VDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Clinical medical disciplines: 750::Traumatology: 783 en
dc.type.version publishedVersion en


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Copyright 2011 Kristiansen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2011 Kristiansen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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