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dc.contributor.authorMeland, Eivinden_US
dc.contributor.authorBrodersen, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-20T12:37:40Z
dc.date.available2018-04-20T12:37:40Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.PublishedMeland E, Brodersen J. Why several truths can be true. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care. 2016;34(3):282-285eng
dc.identifier.issn1502-7724
dc.identifier.issn0281-3432
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/17630
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we offer a perspective on complementarity, acknowledging that it is not possible for human perception and cognition to grasp reality with unambiguous concepts or theories. Therefore, multiple concepts and perspectives are valid when they are not exaggerated beyond reasonable limits and do not claim exclusive validity. We recommend a humble stance enabling respectful dialogue between different perspectives in medical science and practice.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Franciseng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY-NCeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/eng
dc.subjectMedical ethicseng
dc.subjectresearch ethicseng
dc.subjectphilosophy of scienceeng
dc.titleWhy several truths can be trueen_US
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2018-02-01T11:55:43Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2016 The Author(s)
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/02813432.2016.1207146
dc.identifier.cristin1411021
dc.source.journalScandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care


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