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dc.contributor.authorHernar, Ingvilden_US
dc.contributor.authorGraue, Mariten_US
dc.contributor.authorStrandberg, Ragnhild Bjarkøyen_US
dc.contributor.authorNilsen, Roy Miodinien_US
dc.contributor.authorRekdal, Magneen_US
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorLøvaas, Karianne Fjelden_US
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, Tone Vonheimen_US
dc.contributor.authorTell, Grethe S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaugstvedt, Anneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-05T09:15:42Z
dc.date.available2020-08-05T09:15:42Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/23436
dc.description.abstractObjective: We aimed to investigate willingness to complete patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) on a touchscreen computer in the outpatient clinics’ waiting area, estimate the proportion of participants with elevated scores in need of further follow-up, and examine the association between diabetes-related distress and psychological well-being. Methods: We recruited 149 adults (18-74 years) with type 1 diabetes to complete PROMs on a touchscreen computer at Haukeland University Hospital’s diabetes outpatient clinic. We used the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) and the WHO-5 Well-being Index (WHO-5) to examine diabetesrelated distress and psychological well-being. A PAID score ≥40 suggest serious diabetes-related emotional problems whereas a score of ≥30 or minimum one item scored ≥3 qualify for extra follow-up. WHO-5 scores ≤50 indicate suboptimal psychological well-being and scores ≤28 suggest depression. Results: One-hundred twenty (80.5%) participants were to at least a large degree willing to complete PROMs electronically. PAID scores of concern were reported by 74 (49.7%) participants, of which 26 (17.5%) scored ≥40. Forty-one (27.5%) reported suboptimal well-being, while nine (6.0%) reported scores suggesting likely depression. We found a moderate correlation (rho = 0.48, P <.001) between increased diabetes-related distress and reduced psychological well-being. Conclusion: The majority of participants reported willingness to complete electronic PROMs in the outpatient waiting area. Half of them reported moderate to serious diabetes-related distress and about one-fourth reported suboptimal psychological well-being. Using PROMs may help clinicians to identify emotional problems and to become aware of diabetes-related challenges and thus to facilitate targeted follow-up in forthcoming studies.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.titleRoutine assessment of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) in the DiaPROM trialen_US
dc.typeConference object
dc.date.updated2020-01-17T11:43:16Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2019 The Author(s)
dc.identifier.cristin1690801


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