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dc.contributor.authorChristoffersen, Toreen_US
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Luai A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDaltveit, Anne Kjerstien_US
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorEvensen, Elinen_US
dc.contributor.authorFurberg, Anne-Sofieen_US
dc.contributor.authorGracia-Marco, Luisen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrimnes, Gurien_US
dc.contributor.authorNilsen, Ole-Andreasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchei, Beriten_US
dc.contributor.authorTell, Grethe S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVlachopoulous, Dimitrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorWinther, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmaus, Ninaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T09:33:39Z
dc.date.available2018-02-09T09:33:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.PublishedChristoffersen T, Ahmed L, Daltveit AK, Dennison E, Evensen E, Furberg AS, Gracia-Marco L, Grimnes G, Nilsen O, Schei B, Tell GST, Vlachopoulous, Winther A, Emaus N. The influence of birth weight and length on bone mineral density and content in adolescence: The Tromsø Study, Fit Futures. Archives of Osteoporosis. 2017;12:54eng
dc.identifier.issn1862-3514
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/17366
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until: 02.06.2018en_US
dc.description.abstractSummary: The influence of birth weight and length on bone mineral parameters in adolescence is unclear. We found a positive association between birth size and bone mineral content, attenuated by lifestyle factors. This highlights the impact of environmental stimuli and lifestyle during growth. Purpose: The influence of birth weight and length on bone mineral density and content later in life is unclear, especially in adolescence. This study evaluated the impact of birth weight and length on bone mineral density and content among adolescents. Methods: We included 961 participants from the population-based Fit Futures study (2010–2011). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to measure bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) at femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH) and total body (TB). BMD and BMC measures were linked with birth weight and length ascertained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Linear regression models were used to investigate the influence of birth parameters on BMD and BMC. Results: Birth weight was positively associated with BMD-TB and BMC at all sites among girls; standardized β coefficients [95% CI] were 0.11 [0.01, 0.20] for BMD-TB and 0.15 [0.06, 0.24], 0.18 [0.09, 0.28] and 0.29 [0.20, 0.38] for BMC-FN, TH and TB, respectively. In boys, birth weight was positively associated with BMC at all sites with estimates of 0.10 [0.01, 0.19], 0.12 [0.03, 0.21] and 0.15 [0.07, 0.24] for FN, TH and TB, respectively. Corresponding analyses using birth length as exposure gave significantly positive associations with BMC at all sites in both sexes. The significant positive association between birth weight and BMC-TB in girls, and birth length and BMC-TB in boys remained after multivariable adjustment. Conclusions: We found a positive association between birth size and BMC in adolescence. However, this association was attenuated after adjustment for weight, height and physical activity during adolescence.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherSpringereng
dc.subjectBirth weighteng
dc.subjectDXAeng
dc.subjectOsteoporosiseng
dc.subjectHumanseng
dc.subjectBone densityeng
dc.titleThe influence of birth weight and length on bone mineral density and content in adolescence: The Tromsø Study, Fit Futuresen_US
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2018-01-30T11:09:47Z
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2017 International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-017-0348-x
dc.identifier.cristin1478843
dc.source.journalArchives of Osteoporosis


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