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dc.contributor.authorNilsen, Kathrin Skorpaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLund-Johansen, Mortenen_US
dc.contributor.authorNordahl, Stein Helgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorFinnkirk, Monica Katrineen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoplen, Frederik Krageruden_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-28T12:15:30Z
dc.date.available2020-05-28T12:15:30Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.PublishedNilsen KS, Lund-Johansen M, Nordahl SHG, Finnkirk MK, Goplen F. Long-term effects of conservative management of vestibular schwannoma on dizziness, balance, and caloric function. Otolaryngology and head and neck surgery. 2019;161(5):846-851eng
dc.identifier.issn0194-5998
dc.identifier.issn1097-6817
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1956/22398
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To study the development of dizziness, caloric function, and postural sway during long-term observation of untreated vestibular schwannoma patients. Study Design: Retrospective review of a prospectively maintained longitudinal cohort. Setting: Tertiary referral hospital. Subjects and Methods: Patients with vestibular schwannoma undergoing wait-and-scan management were included—specifically, those who did not require treatment during a minimum radiologic follow-up of 1 year. Baseline data and follow-up included magnetic resonance imaging, posturography, bithermal caloric tests, and a dizziness questionnaire. Main outcomes were prevalence of moderate to severe dizziness, canal paresis, and postural instability at baseline and follow-up, as compared with McNemar’s test. Results: Out of 433 consecutive patients with vestibular schwannoma, 114 did not require treatment during follow-up and were included. Median radiologic follow-up was 10.2 years (interquartile range, 4.5 years). Age ranged from 31 to 78 years (mean, 59 years; SD, 10 years; 62% women). Median tumor volume at baseline was 139 mm3 (interquartile range, 314 mm3). This did not change during follow-up (P = .446). Moderate to severe dizziness was present in 27% at baseline and 19% at follow-up (P = .077). Postural unsteadiness was present in 17% at baseline and 21% at follow-up (P = .424). Canal paresis was present in 51% at baseline and 56% at follow-up (P = .664). Conclusions: There was no significant change in the prevalence of dizziness, postural sway, or canal paresis during conservative management of vestibular schwannoma, while tumor volume remained unchanged. This indicates a favorable prognosis in these patients with regard to vestibular symptoms.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherSageeng
dc.titleLong-term effects of conservative management of vestibular schwannoma on dizziness, balance, and caloric functionen_US
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2020-02-03T08:33:12Z
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2019
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0194599819860831
dc.identifier.cristin1760275
dc.source.journalOtolaryngology and head and neck surgery


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