Vis enkel innførsel

dc.contributor.authorFossheim, Hallvard
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-22T12:41:04Z
dc.date.available2021-06-22T12:41:04Z
dc.date.created2020-06-25T11:26:11Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn9780367366117
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2760666
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until: 2021-09-18en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the Republic, Plato seems to advocate the banning of most extant poetry, because of its corrupting effect on the soul. A central claim in the next section will be that thumos as a specific module or capacity of the soul, as this is depicted in the Republic, is supposed to be trained to respond to what is kalon. The very notion of truth seems at times to be considered primarily in terms of impact with regard to the kalon. It is in this sense that “telling the greatest falsehood about the most important things make a fine story. Aristotle takes the artist’s activity and product to be kalon in being ideally suited to create a special form of cognitive experience in the spectator or reader. To very briefly recapitulate the philosophers’ paradigmatic art recipients, Plato’s audience is a mass of people, some of them very young, corrupted on a psychological level below the threshold of rational, even conscious processing.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Poetics in its Aristotelian Context
dc.titleTo kalon and the experience of arten_US
dc.typeChapteren_US
dc.description.versionacceptedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2020 Routledgeen_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.cristin1817099
dc.source.pagenumber34-50en_US
dc.identifier.citationIn: Destrée, P., Heath, M., & Munteanu, D.L. (Eds.). (2020). The Poetics in its Aristotelian Context. 34-50en_US


Tilhørende fil(er)

Thumbnail

Denne innførselen finnes i følgende samling(er)

Vis enkel innførsel