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dc.contributor.authorGorlée, Dinda
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-16T13:51:54Z
dc.date.available2022-03-16T13:51:54Z
dc.date.created2021-12-14T11:59:47Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2198-9605
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/2985613
dc.descriptionUnder embargo until: 2022-11-16en_US
dc.description.abstractSebeok started his career as an ethnographer, focusing on the verbal art of anthropology to describe the cultures associated with then-called “primitive” languages. He followed Bloomfield’s linguistics to study Boas’ anthropology of primitive art to investigate man as a civilized member of a native indigenous community with art-like speech habits. Sebeok’s earliest articles were ethnographic descriptions of non-Western folktales from the Cheremis people, which he reformulated into Saussure’s phonetic system to involve literal but culturally free translations. Later, Sebeok developed Peirce’s ethnosemiotics by explaining Sapir-Whorf’s two-way differentiation of linguistic-and-cultural texts. The coded interplay of anthroposemiotics moved Sebeok from language-and-culture to language-with-culture, thence to build up the merged compound of linguïculture.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherDe Gruyteren_US
dc.titleLinguïculture: Thomas A. Sebeok as a revolutionary ethnographeren_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Bostonen_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/css-2021-2034
dc.identifier.cristin1968308
dc.source.journalChinese Semiotic Studiesen_US
dc.source.pagenumber525-550en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Semiotic Studies. 2021, 17 (4), 525-550.en_US
dc.source.volume17en_US
dc.source.issue4en_US


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