Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBjorvatn, Bjørn
dc.contributor.authorWaage, Siri
dc.contributor.authorSaxvig, Ingvild W.
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-30T13:19:46Z
dc.date.available2022-12-30T13:19:46Z
dc.date.created2022-11-26T13:18:00Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.issn0962-1105
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/3040093
dc.description.abstractThe present study estimated the frequency of using methods or tricks to fall asleep in the general Norwegian population. Further, people with chronic insomnia were compared with people without chronic insomnia. A representative sample of 1028 participants aged 18 years or older completed a web-based survey. The response rate was 33.5%. Insomnia symptoms were assessed with the validated Bergen Insomnia Scale, and chronic insomnia based on ICSD-3/DSM-5 criteria. Data were analysed with chi-square tests and logistic regression with adjustment for sex, age, education, and circadian preference. The results showed that 34.3% reported using a method or a trick to fall asleep, with relaxation exercises/breathing exercises being the most common. More females (39.5%) compared with males (29.1%) reported the use of a method/trick to fall asleep with an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 1.44. Chronic insomnia was reported by 24.9%, and clearly associated with higher use of such methods/tricks (53.7%; aOR = 3.49). Among the participants without chronic insomnia, 28.1% reported using methods/tricks to fall asleep. In conclusion, most people do not use methods or tricks to fall asleep, but chronic insomnia was associated with a higher frequency of such use. Still, since methods/tricks were also used by some participants without chronic insomnia, this may suggest that, for some people, this strategy may be effective or at least does not seem to disrupt the sleep onset process.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsNavngivelse 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/deed.no*
dc.titleDo people use methods or tricks to fall asleep? A comparison between people with and without chronic insomniaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2022 The Author(s)en_US
dc.source.articlenumbere13763en_US
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jsr.13763
dc.identifier.cristin2081619
dc.source.journalJournal of Sleep Researchen_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sleep Research. 2022, e13763.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Navngivelse 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Navngivelse 4.0 Internasjonal